TalentEducation.org - Suzuki Method Central

  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Hello, dear Suzuki families,

Here are some Suzuki violin (but good for any instrument) tips and teaching points for your daily practicing sessions at home. I welcome your own personal suggestions, opinions, and testimonials. I greatly appreciate your comments and feedback on these articles.

Don't forget to login to TalentEducation.org to access our entire collection of Suzuki practicing resources. It's easy. Registration to TalentEducation.org is and will always be FREE.

Thanks for being part of our Suzuki music family!

Practice away!



Powered by Web Agency


Just... Keep Calm and Listen To Music

Keep Calm and Listen To Music

Cut all the DRAMA! Just STOP what you're doing, KEEP CALM and LISTEN! Also, KEEP CALM AND PRACTICE YOUR SUZUKI MUSIC WITH A PURPOSE.

Powered by Web Agency
 

Violin Strings 101: Tutorial on types of violin strings

Violin Strings 101: The brand of strings I use and a tutorial on types of violin strings.

Powered by Web Agency
 

Pinchas Zukerman: Bruch Violin Concerto

This a great example of great phrasing, and that TONE! I like it at this speed. Those who want to "show off" at 1.5X the printed speed can't come up with the marvelous depth of this interpretation, which needs this tempo and much more. Zukerman gives it all here in this truly beautiful rendition of such a popular concerto. 

Powered by Web Agency
 

Ten Commandments for Musicians

Ten Commandments for Musicians

"And the Lord God has given me two more tablets of stone, on which he has written his precepts especially for those who would praise him with song, instructing them in the ways of proper practice."

And Moses read:

I. THOU SHALT HAVE A PLAN BEFORE THOU STARTEST PRACTICING.

II. THOU SHALT WARM UP THOROUGHLY BEFORE THOU STARTEST THINE EXERCISES.

III. THOU SHALT NOT ONLY PLAY THE EASY STUFF, BUT SHALT SPEND TIME ON THAT WHICH THOU NEEDEST TO IMPROVE.

IV. THOU SHALT TRULY LISTEN TO WHAT THOU PLAYEST, RATHER THAN SIMPLY PLAYING WITHOUT INTEREST.

V. THOU SHALT NOT EXPECT ALL THINE PRACTICES TO BE PERFECT.

VI. THOU SHALT NOT CRITICIZE THYSELF OVERLY HARSHLY DURING THE PRACTICE, NOR TAKE THE NAME OF THINE INSTRUMENT OR THINE MUSIC TEACHER IN VAIN WHEN THINGS DON'T GO THE WAY YOU HOPED!

VII. THOU SHALT PUT IN THE TIME THAT IS NECESSARY.

VIII. THOU SHALT NOT NEGLECT SPENDING SOME TIME TO HAVE FUN WITH THINE INSTRUMENT DURING EVERY SINGLE PRACTICE.

IX. THOU SHALT RECORD THINE PROGRESS IN SOME SORT OF JOURNAL.

X. THOU SHALT PROPERLY PUT AWAY THINE INSTRUMENT, THINE SHEET MUSIC AND ALL THINE OTHER STUFF WHEN THINE PRACTICE TIME IS OVER.

IF THOU FOLLOWEST MINE INSTRUCTIONS THOU SHALT SING WITHOUT SCREECHING, PLAY WITHOUT SQUAWKING, AND SHALT CAUSE THINE NEIGHBORS TO TAP THEIR TOES WITH SMILES UPON THEIR FACES.

Happy Obeying!

Powered by Web Agency
 

Every Musician's Tote Bag

Every Musician's Tote Bag

By Rigo Murillo

I often see that successful music students and parents always manage to be well prepared for performances, auditions, and weekly lessons. They always have what they need when it comes to books, accessories, and all that's needed to have a nice lesson time. But even the best well-intentioned student and parent may forget a thing or two that should be in their music tote bag. Even Yehudi Menuhin, the famous violinist of the twentieth century wrote in one of his books about what every violinist should have in his/her violin case.

For starters, here is a "musician's tote bag kit" for you to think about:

  • All music books needed, including Suzuki repertoire, etudes, scales, sight reading, music theory
  • A metronome (or two) and extra replacement batteries if it's electronic
  • Pencil (to write notes on music)
  • Pen (to take notes during lesson)
  • Practice notebook
  • Nail Clipper
  • Music to listen to (iPod, CD player, etc.) - There will be time riding/waiting... why waste it?

String Players, please add these:

Tote bag for Musicians

  • Extra Strings - I cannot over emphasize this. GET EXTRA STRINGS, They WILL brake some day!
  • Shoulder rest (if applicable). Again... I have seen too many violin and viola players forgetting their shoulder rest that I have to write it again: Shoulder rest!
  • ROSIN!
  • Cleaning cloth
  • Nail Clipper (yes, again, I know)
  • Tuner/Metronome
  • Cello Pin Stop/Strap (if applicable)
  • Cello Chair/Bench (if applicable)
  • Peg compound

I am sure that getting all these applicable accessories and necessities will make your practicing more consistent, successful and pleasant. It will at least impless your music teacher when an emergency comes up.

Happy practicing!

Rigo Murillo

Powered by Web Agency
 

Audio Practice Tutorials on TalentEducation.org

Here is a number of audio tutorials to practice your Suzuki violin exercises. You can tap into those and use them for your daily home practice. If you haven't seen the resources page yet, I would recommend you to take a look at the various audio tutorials, practicing charts, and tips contained in the resources page.

Particularly, there is a number of beginning pre-twinkle audio tutorials, along with a practice chart, metronome implementation, etc.

Here is a list of linked resources:

Mr. Murillo's Practice Audio Clips:

Tune E string
Tune A string
Tune D string
Tune G string
String Crossing - Violin
Twinkle Rhythms - Violin
Twinkle Var. A & C Rhythms - Cello
Monkey Song on E string - Violin
Monkey Song on A string - Cello
Twinkle Rock - E string
Twinkle Rock - A string
Twinkle Var. A for Violin
Twinkle Var. B for Violin
Twinkle Var. C for Violin
Twinkle Var. D for Violin
Twinkle Theme practice - Violin
Twinkle Theme  for Violin with Piano Acc.
Boil'em Cabbage Down

Lesson / Practice Companion Documents:

Twelve-Point Practice Check list
Correct Practice
Features of the Suzuki Method
History of the Suzuki Method
Instrument Care Instructions
Learning Twinkle for Cello
Learning Twinkle for Violin
Monkey Song for Cello
Weekly Lesson and Practice Chart
Practice Tips
Target Skills for Pre-Twinklers
List Suzuki Supplies and Vendors
Suzuki Violin Repertoire List
How to Take notes at Lessons
Violin Anatomy - Parts of the Instrument
Suzuki Violin Curriculum

Happy Practicing!

Rigo Murillo, Suzuki Strings Specialist

Powered by Web Agency
 

Suzuki Violin Pre-Twinkle Skills

By the completion of the Twinkle Variations, the student should have developed the following skills (Many of which may be at a basic level of development):

  • Rest Position
  • Stance, focus, endurance
  • Listening skills, attention, habits
  • Sidedness
  • Following directions, quickness
  • Opposites (high-low, loud-soft)
  • Posture
  • Bow hold
  • Heavy head holding violin
  • Rhythms
  • String names and pitches
  • How to Bow
  • Basic E string posture
  • String crossing, E and A string
  • Bow control, tip control
  • Relaxed, natural weight of bow arm
  • Square of the arm
  • Bow held silently on string
  • Stop form bowing on middle of bow
  • Left hand shape
  • Finger numbers
  • Finger patterns
  • Preparation fingers
  • Quick placement of fingers
  • Soft left thumb/ relational left fingers
  • Coordination of bow and fingers
  • Pizzicato partners
  • Kreisler highway
  • Tonalization
  • Care of instrument and bow
  • Practice Skills
  • Memory skills
  • Ability to be positive

© Copyright 2000 Rigo Murillo. All rights reserved.

Powered by Web Agency
 

Effective and Simple Suzuki Review Technique

BucketThe problem with review is NOT that students don't want to do it. It is that it's difficult to do it consistently throughout the Suzuki repertoire. 

"Bucket" Review Technique:

Write all the pieces' names on separate pieces of paper (or better yet, ping-pong balls), put them in a "bucket". Everyday, have your violinist draw a few pieces of paper (or ping-pong balls) one at a time, reviewing each one, then, put the ones played in a second bucket. 

When you're through, change buckets and go through them again. When your child learns a new piece, add a new paper or ball with its name to the bucket. You can also include all of the pieces in the current book, and have your child LISTEN to it when it comes in the drawing. 

This is the easiest way to "hit" all of the pieces before the "favorites" get played more, letting the others get relegated.

Happy practicing!

Rigo Murillo

Join our Facebook Page!

Powered by Web Agency
 

Improving your pre-twinkler's concentration skills

One of the most challenging tasks for a young child in learning the violin is to stay concentrated long enough to stay in place and hold the instrument. Here are some fun exercises that have proven highly successful for keeping pre-Twinklers on task and improve concentration skills.

Powered by Web Agency
 

Practice Tips from the "Suzuki Pro-Parents"

Dig into some practice tips from other experienced parents of music students like yours. These are ways they have found that help during the "dreaded practice time" each day.

Powered by Web Agency
 

Inspiring Quotes

"Musical ability is not an inborn talent, but an ability which can be developed. Any child who is properly trained can develop musical ability, just as all children develop the ability to speak their mother tongue. The potential of every child is unlimited."

- Shinichi Suzuki


Excellence From Beginning To Advanced


Login

Please login or register to access the complete collection of practice videos, audio help tutorials, articles, and materials.

Registration is and will always be FREE.




Share It!